navigation


i-justreally-like-cats-okay:

CAT underneath bed sheets.

i-justreally-like-cats-okay:

CAT underneath bed sheets.


rats-in-the-walls:

machiavelli1601:

alarmbark:

lizard lizard

I like how it’s just accepted that an infant is an animal

It is

rats-in-the-walls:

machiavelli1601:

alarmbark:

lizard lizard

I like how it’s just accepted that an infant is an animal

It is


slutsandsinners:

catieewebster:

roadxzombie:

milkshake1378:

chlorodream:

lady-of-redemption:

He did it. He actually managed to describe how it feels to live with depression and suicidal tendencies.

this is really, really important

Wow….perfect. The old paint…..

I haven’t seen this guys stuff for months but this still hits me as hard as ever

Always repost! I love this so much!!!

YES OMG

#wow

kaible:

catbountry:

zygoats:

zygoats:

a kid from my school sent me a pic an elaborate painting of atticus finch shirtless smoking a blunt while a colt 45 is being poured on him along with a text that read “hot dad 2: dad harder” and this is the closest thing to a sext I have ever received

found itimage

You neglected to mention the Tupac and Biggie cherubs how dare you.

look there’s a lot going on here it makes perfect sense that they’d forget some details


the-leader-in-red:

OH MY GOD I HAVE FOUND THE GIF OF MY LIFE

the-leader-in-red:

OH MY GOD I HAVE FOUND THE GIF OF MY LIFE



watermelon-spiced-latte:

mechanicsofaheart1:

beckett-luvs-her-goober:

lokisoldiergothiddlestoned:

corra-18:

irishsub:

she is such a great lady.

*cries with utter joy*

SHE DID IT THE EXACT SAME WAY WHAT

Let’s be honest, Julie Andrews is Tumblr’s official cool grandma

Forever reblog

Even the pigeons are there




mapleglowsticks:

thehat2:

meladoodle:

what do you mean a thesaurus isnt a dinosaur

image

this is adorable as fuck and you can’t tell me otherwise


thetardis-is-acylonraider:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

at the restaurant where i work we like to call this “walk-in amnesia”
i hear someone say “what the FUCK did i come in here for????” at least once a day if not more

thetardis-is-acylonraider:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

at the restaurant where i work we like to call this “walk-in amnesia”

i hear someone say “what the FUCK did i come in here for????” at least once a day if not more


exgynocraticgrrl:

Breaking The Male Code: After Steubenville, A Call To Action

Sports Editor at The Nation, Dave Zirin


lungbender:

Me: 

image

You:

image


"Pockets are a must, for storing your necessaries. Knife, money, tobacco, frogs, string, marbles, bullets. Read your Twain for suggested pocket wares."
— Nick Offerman prescribes your everyday carry (via putthison)

a friendly reminder

beahbeah:

marfmellow:

that calling women of color exotic is

  • fucking racist
  • dehumanizing
  • othering
  • and not a fucking compliment

image

(x)